Tag Archives: henry ford

Risk

“You are creating yourself, your life, and the world around you in every moment. Thoughts are actions.” – Journey From Ego

Question #1: How many of you are happy with (the direction of) your life?

Question #2: How many of you wish to change your lives, but feel stuck?

Question #3: Are you aware of your passion, that which brings you joy?

Question #4: Are you willing to take a risk to follow your passion?

I ran across this quote from Henry Ford again recently: “If you think you can do a thing, or you think you can’t do a thing, you’re right.” It got me thinking about the manner in which we create our lives. Do you engage in those activities that bring you joy, or that whisper to you, Come Play? I will admit that I let fear get in my way sometimes. There are things that whisper to me that I’m still resisting, to my own demise, I know. To my credit I will say that although I never had been inspired to participate in the Portland to Coast relay, (in truth I thought everyone who did it must be insane,) when the opportunity was presented to me, despite my reservations I did, and I had so much fun I did it three years in a row! I include this example here only to make the point that I believe we are better off in the long run when we follow the whispers and the synchronicities that appear and  which facilitate growth, rather that to allow fear (ego) to influence our decisions and to limit our lives.

Henry Ford, born in 1863, grew up the son of a farmer. He left his father’s farm, risking his security, at the age of 16 to pursue his fascination with machinery. He took a job as an apprentice at the Michigan Car Company, a manufacturer of railroad cars in Detroit. Over the next few years Henry moved between jobs when he thought he could learn more somewhere else. At the age of 28, now married to Clara Bryant, Ford moved to Detroit taking a job as a night engineer for the Edison Electric Illuminating Company. He knew little about electricity, but again perceived this as an opportunity learn.

Within five years Henry had risen to chief engineer of the Illuminating Company. But this was not his passion. His passion, the one that had drawn him from his home, was machinery. When he learned of people across the country working to build horseless carriages he became one of them. In 1896, with the help of a team of friends he completed the Quadricycle, his first self-propelled vehicle.

After completing his second car in 1898 he began to convince other people to sign on and help him achieve his vision. Knowing nothing about business, his first two companies failed. However, being no stranger to risk he took even greater ones building and even driving racing cars. The success of these cars attracted financial backing and in 1903 Henry incorporated Ford Motor Company.

Of course Henry’s story doesn’t end there, but if he hadn’t followed his passion, hadn’t been willing to take a risk, had worked in isolation, had been afraid of failure, Ford Motor Company wouldn’t exist today. And I don’t believe the world would have been a better place for its lack of existence and I don’t believe our climate would be any different than it is now, because someone else who had a similar fearless passion would have gone and done it anyway. It just wouldn’t have been Henry Ford. And I don’t believe Henry had Ford Motor Company as his goal at the age of 16, or even 25. I believe that following his passion, taking the risks he took, and trusting in his God allowed him to follow his path and in doing so to create the life he chose, despite the difficulties he encountered.

We can create our lives too. We do create our lives. It’s sometimes an uncomfortable truth to admit that we are responsible for being exactly where we are in our lives. If we don’t like it we can change it. The moment we decide what we want that change to look like, the universe begins to act upon that thought.

“I believe God is managing affairs and that [S]He doesn’t need        any advice from me. With God in charge, I believe everything will work out for the best in the end. So what is there to worry about?”

– Henry Ford

What passion is calling to you?